Quick Quiz #8 – the answers

Here are the answers to our recent Quick Quiz which has a mathematical flavour.

So, how did you do?

There will be another Quick Quiz next month.

1 What number comes next in this number sequence: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8….?
A) 10
B) 13
C) 15
ANSWER: B) 13 – this is a Fibonacci numbers sequence, each number the sum of the two preceding it. The sequence explains many features of the natural world.

2 Which of these is NOT a prime number?
A) 17
B) 47
C) 111
ANSWER: C) 111 – a prime number is divisible only by itself and 111 is divisible by 3.

3 How many zeroes follow the 1 when expressing the value of a googol?
A) 10,000
B) 1,000
C) 100
ANSWER: C) 100

4 If a car is travelling at 60mph, how far will it travel in two-and-a-half hours?
A) 150 miles
B) 180 miles
C) 190 miles
ANSWER: A) 150 miles

5 How many faces does an octahdron have?
A) 7
B) 8
C) 9
ANSWER: B) 8

6 What is BODMAS?
A) A way of ordering how calculations are solved
B) A way of calculating the number of sides an object has
C) A measurement of obesity
ANSWER: A) A way of ordering how calculations are solved

7 What is the long side of a right-angled triangle called?
A) Hypoteneuse
B) Numerator
C) Fractal
ANSWER: A) Hypoteneuse

8 What is the square root of 81?
A) 7
B) 8
C) 9
ANSWER: C) 9

9 Which of these is nearest to the value of pi?
A) 2.8888
B) 3.142
C) 9.733
ANSWER: B) 3.142

10 Which of these fractions is the biggest?
A) One quarter
B) Three eighths
C) Seven sixteenths
ANSWER: C) Seven sixteenths

Quick Quiz #8

Hello again and welcome to our latest Quick Quiz.

There are ten questions, each with three possible answers. All you have to do is guess the right one.

There isn’t a prize – it’s just for fun.

This time we are going to test your numbers knowledge.

We will reveal the answers at 9am on March 29, 2021.

1 What number comes next in this number sequence: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8….?
A) 10
B) 13
C) 15

2 Which of these is NOT a prime number?
A) 17
B) 47
C) 111

3 How many zeroes follow the 1 when expressing the value of a googol?
A) 10,000
B) 1,000
C) 100

4 If a car is travelling at 60mph, how far will it travel in two-and-a-half hours?
A) 150 miles
B) 180 miles
C) 190 miles

5 How many faces does an octahdron have?
A) 7
B) 8
C) 9

6 What is BODMAS?
A) A way of ordering how calculations are solved
B) A way of calculating the number of sides an object has
C) A measurement of obesity

7 What is the long side of a right-angled triangle called?
A) Hypoteneuse
B) Numerator
C) Fractal

8 What is the square root of 81?
A) 7
B) 8
C) 9

9 Which of these is nearest to the value of pi?
A) 2.8888
B) 3.142
C) 9.733

10 Which of these fractions is the biggest?
A) One quarter
B) Three eighths
C) Seven sixteenths

The beauty and brilliance of Bruges

Fietser op de Markt

Chase reporter ANTONY CLAY takes a trip to Bruges in northern Belgium and finds a delightful place to visit

IT’S a sad fact that Belgium doesn’t come high on many people’s ‘must see’ list, but it is in fact a small country that really hits above its weight.

It is a little gem which offers plenty for lovers of culture, history and, of course, good food and drink.

Bruges in the north of the country — one of the nation’s real treasures — is a heady mix of the ancient and the modern.

Bruges — residents pronounce it something like brooger, and let’s face it, they’re probably right — has many stunning historical delights. Churches, museums, old shopping streets, old breweries.

You could find out how chocolate is made at one of the specialist shops. One thing that will be pointed out is that there is chocolate pretending to be Belgian chocolate and then there is REAL Belgian chocolate.

Het Belfort

There is the Chocolaterie Sukerbuyc, for instance, which is the real deal and a magnet for chocoholics.

For lovers of the stronger stuff, one attraction might be the Halve Maan Brewery where the delights of Belgian beer, and its history, are revealed. You can find out about the brewing process and be taken through the fascinating history of the brewery. In the past, the beer delivery staff were partly paid in booze – a mere six bottles a day! – and after also sampling some of the wares they were supposed to be distributing the cart drivers had to let their horses bring them back to base, for obvious reasons.

A good walk around Bruges will introduce you to the rich history of this city.

Frietmuseum
Frietmuseum

Any city with a museum dedicated to potato fries – the frietmuseum – is one that I would heartily recommend.

The city square is a wonderful trip back in time with the majestic town hall dominating the scene.

There are shops and eateries such as the eccentric and upmarket Restaurant Zeno on Vlamingstraat.

If you wanted to venture out of the city itself, you could pop to the old village of Damme just a few miles away. Or even hire a bike and cycle there along quiet and safe bicycle routeways.

Damme, with a current population of around 700, may look small and twee now but in medieval times it was an important place with hundreds of boats mooring in its port. Today, it is quiet but its buildings and surroundings tell the story of its Burgundian past.

De Halve Maan Brewery
De Halve Maan Brwery

The size and extravagance of the Gothic-style Town Hall, which dates from 1464, suggests a finer long-gone age when rival armies fought over this area because the town’s ancient port attracted the attention of merchants and monarchs alike. Alas,

Damme’s time in the spotlight faded, but a visit there today shows enticing glimpses into the past: the Church of Our Lady, for instance, the delightful old houses, or the 15th century House de Grote Sterre which is the base for the Damme tourist office – well worth a visit.

The market square in Damme is delightful but the settlement has much of historic and cultural merit to see.

Cycling in Damme is a pleasure and offers the opportunity to check out the countryside around the town – a nature reserve where all manner of wildlife, especially birds (I saw a stork, which made my day!) can be seen. Bikes can be hired at the Damme tourist centre and in Bruges at a reasonable price. It is a good way to explore the forts, dykes and windmills between Damme and Bruges.

In the year 865 a fort was built where the city now is although there is evidence of earlier Bronze Age and Iron Age settlements in the area. There was also Roman activity but it was attacks by Vikings which prompted Baldwin I (Margrave or Count of Flanders) to erect the fort.

Dijver in Bruges

Bruges got its city charter on July 27, 1128, and grew as a trading centre thanks to its then access to the North Sea but this began to decline as the Zwin channel to the sea gradually silted up.

The city developed an artistic reputation as the Flemish school of painters developed oil painting techniques.

The first book in English by William Caxton was published in the city.

The city began to prosper again in the 19th century, particularly becoming a popular place to visit by tourists,. It was a book — Bruges-la-Morte by Georges Rodenbach, published in 1892 — which spurred people to come and investigate the supposedly sleepy place.

The development of the port at Zeebrugge was a much-needed fillip to Bruges’ fortunes.

Wandering down the city’s old streets gives a great sense of Bruges’ long history. It was hardly damaged in both the First and Second World Wars despite being occupied in both conflicts by German forces, so that much of its historic past remains intact.

From the splendid scenic view of Rozenhoedkaai to the architectural majesty of Saint Saviour’s Cathedral, there is so much to see.

Bruges

There are many museums such as the Museum of the Church of Our Lady and the Diamond Museum or you could sample the works of Salvador Dali on show at the Dalí Xpo-Gallery.

Other attractions include the Bargebrug (Barge Bridge), Arenthuis mansion, the 13th century Florentine loge merchant premises and the Gruuthuse Museum, as well as the Stadhuis and Tolhuis.

It really is a city to be experienced. There is a delight on every corner for the visitor.

There are usually events taking place throughout the year so there is always something new to experience.

Bruges is a lovely city with so much to offer for all ages. Any visit to Belgium has to include it but it is certainly an attraction in its own right.

* For information about visiting Bruges, contact http://www.visitbruges.be. You can also try http://www.damme-online.com/

Quick Quiz #7 – the answers

Here are the answers to the quiz we set you earlier this month.

How did you do?

There will be another Quick Quiz very soon.

1 During emergencies, the Government has COBRA meetings. But what does COBRA stand for?
A) Co-ordinated Official British Response Assessment
B) Civilian Organised Bureau for Rapid Activity
C) Cabinet Office Briefing Room A
ANSWER: C) Cabinet Office Briefing Room A

2 In which Puccini opera do the characters Ping, Pang and Pong appear?
A) Madama Butterfly
B) Tosca
C) Turandot
ANSWER: C) Turandot

3 TIM, Orac and BOSS featured in different sci-fi TV series. But what were they?
A) Spaceships
B) Computers
C) Alien commanders
ANSWER: B) Computers – TIM was the computer in children’s sci-fi series The Tomorrow People, Orac appeared in Blake’s 7 and BOSS was intent on taking over the world in the Dr Who adventure The Green Death.

4 Who was the first female newsreader on British television?
A) Barbara Mandell
B) Angela Rippon
C) Nan Winton
ANSWER: A) Barbara Mandell – she appeared on ITV news from its launch in 1955. Nan Winton was the first BBC newsreader from 1960. Angela Rippon began reading the national news in 1974.

5 Who was the first Archbishop of Canterbury?
A) Thomas Cranmer
B) Augustine
C) William Laud
ANSWER: B) Augustine

6 What is the name of the company famous for making teddy bears?
A) Wedgewood
B) Faberge
C) Steiff
ANSWER: C) Steiff

7 Which of these was NOT part of a trilogy of films by highly esteemed director Krystof Kieslowski?
A) Three Colours Red
B) Three Colours Black
C) Three Colours Blue
ANSWER: B) Three Colours Black – the other film in the trilogy was Three Colours White. Red, white and blue are, ofcourse, the colours of the French flag and all the stories were based in France.

8 What is the link between American Erika LaBrie and the Eiffel Tower?
A) She climbed it
B) She painted it
C) She married it
ANSWER: C) She married it – Erika LaBrie ‘married’ the famous Parisian landmark in 2007 in a commitment ceremony, becoming known as Erika Eiffel.

9 How is Queen Elizabeth II related to Queen Victoria?
A) She is her grand-daughter
B) She is her great great grand-daughter
C) She is her distant cousin
ANSWER: B) She is her great great grand-daughter

10 On what date was South Yorkshire created?
A) April 1, 1974
B) January 1, 1982
C) March 5, 1965
ANSWER: A) April 1, 1974

A mum’s story — warts and all

Jodie Nicholson

Chase reporter MICHAEL UPTON meets mum Jodie Nicholson who has put her IVF experiences into print in a bid to help others

A MUM who has written a “warts and all” book about her experience of undergoing IVF hopes it will become a guide for other would-be parents.

Jodie Nicholson, of Aston in Rotherham, told of her struggle to become a mum through a diary charting the early days of tests and injections through to the challenges and joys of pregnancy and the ordeal of giving birth in the midst of a pandemic.

And she said she was touched by the positive feedback she had received since IVF Only was published.

“The whole point of writing the book was I wanted it to be warts and all and what IVF was really like for me and to tell my story honestly,” said 30-year-old Jodie, now the proud mum to eight-month-old Nell.

“I have had mums thanking me for speaking up and saying: ‘Everything you are going through and feeling is normal.’

“Often you feel you are alone. I’ve had a lot of people who’ve been through IVF saying they cannot believe how relatable it is.

“I also had some quite interesting feedback from people who’ve not gone through IVF, too – they have said it’s inspiring and eye-opening of what it takes for some people to start a family and have a child.”

At times, Jodie’s emotions were raw, and Jodie’s anger and bitterness is graphically conveyed in the book, but there are also laugh-out-loud moments and moving touches, especially when she acknowledges the calmness and kindness of husband Steve.
IVF Only is highly technical at times, such as when detailing the process of regular pre-implantation injections, but also packs plenty of punch — and Jodie’s account of the pain she endured during childbirth may well resonate with many mums.

Jodie openly admitted she had considered throwing in the towel with her diary but had been determined to press on.

“I think the benefit for me was people do expect you to just get on with things but they don’t realise that at this time this was my whole life and between work and relationships I did struggle with it,” she said.

“At the time, nothing else really mattered.

“I did battle with whether I should continue with it.

“In the beginning, it was such a relief for me and there were times where I just couldn’t be bothered.

“But I felt I had to stick it out and carry on and I’m so proud of the final result.”

Jodie said she was looking forward to the day her baby daughter Nell would be able to read about how she was created.

“It is really important for me and Steve that she does know she was made – she was made of love of course but without science she would not be here,” said Jodie.

Jodie said she hoped IVF Only could be a help to all readers, adding: “I wanted it to be a manual for anyone going through IVF and they can use it how they like.

“I put in a trigger warning saying there would be references to childbirth and labour but I hope people will be able to read the book at least up to that point and that even read in parts the book would be useful to people.

“Four or five years ago, I could never have dreamed I would be a mum so I would like to think whatever you are in your journey my book can provide some sort of help.

“There is always hope, whether it be through adoption or surrogacy, there is always something else to try.”

Jodie said she was delighted with how the book had been received, adding: “We are doing really well and I’ve sold copies in Spain, Germany, Canada, Australia and USA, which is unbelievable, so I can say I’m international. I’m really proud of that.”

IVF Only may be out but the Nicholsons’ story may yet have another chapter, as Jodie and Steve are considering having more IVF to make a little brother or sister for Nell.

“We still have embryos left, so we don’t want them going to waste,” said Jodie. “I’ve done it once so I can do it again.”

The Untouchable artist

Manish Harijan (picture by Ryan Braidley

by SHARON GILL – Rotherham Open Arts Renaissance (ROAR) chief executive

CHOOSING a life in the arts can be a big decision for many people, and challenging for their families to understand. It is not a career choice that offers security nor surety.

For some people, though, it is not a choice, it is a necessity, and this need to create provides the strength and motivation that drives them on in the face of all hardships and barriers.

Manish Harijan is one such individual.

Born in 1985 in a village in the western Himalayas in Nepal to a family in the untouchable caste, the Dalit (Sarki), Manish would help his father in his work as a shoemaker. This was the early introduction to materials, to making, to shape and form. He recalls his childhood working with bamboo, clay and other rural crafts and refers to his father as an artist and this period of time as being where he developed the basis for his artistic capacity.

Schooling was a challenge, coming from poverty, and education cost money. Lower caste workers were not paid a living wage leaving nothing for investing in their future. A tangible form of financial discrimination.

Manish was orphaned in his mid-teens and was brought to the attention of Krishna Karki, the founder of SWAN, a Nepalese charity. It is this relationship that has enabled Manish’s incredible journey, and his connection to Rotherham.

Shaman

Rotherham-based businessman Nick Cragg and his wife Marie are founding members of PHASE Worldwide (Practical Help Achieving Self Empowerment), a charity based in Vienna. PHASE Nepal, a dedicated NGO working exclusively with remote Himalayan villages, was established in 2006 and now employs approximately 200 people. It was through this charitable work that Nick and Marie met Krishna from SWAN, and consequently Manish.

Krishna had witnessed the creative talent from this orphan who would draw in the dirt with a stick, demonstrating “a precocious talent” in his village. Nick and Marie agreed to sponsor Manish’s education, and further education.

Manish is the first to admit he was not a natural at formal education. He failed his School Living Certificate several times.

I wonder at this point in our interview about the drive and motivation to persist. Here is a rural Nepalese young man, orphaned, having experienced huge social injustice through a nation’s historic cultural system, being supported by strangers at that point. Yet he kept on trying. Manish explains: “I had the intention to study fine art, I needed that certificate. It didn’t feel like failure, I was curious.”

Should you meet Manish, this response provides a great indication of the man. He is thoughtful, grounded, and calm, approaching all of life’s challenges as an observer, gathering experiences and inspirations, while examining the human condition and the ways we react and respond to social injustice.

With such focus on his end goal, Manish of course makes it to Kathmandu to study for an art degree, with financial support.

In my ignorance, I wonder at the situation that enables Manish to consider a career, a life in the arts, when it is so unpredictable.

He recalls that his school teachers saw his talent and suggested he become an artist. He also explains that his early experiences taught him that artistic skills are also survival skills, thinking back to his father’s life. That arrogance of youth is also evident in his decision making, the need to make your mark and challenge the oppressor.

Kali-Odalisque

Coming from the lower caste he was considered to be incapable of any capacity for intellect, and that was a challenge worth fighting, in a positive way. The fight for equality in Nepal was already underway.

We discussed the caste system for a little while. I had recently watched a film, The Last Man by Shatterproof Productions, exposing the inhuman activities suffered by the lowest caste and the sewer cleaning employment practices in India, where the identification of different castes is often through your name. So why not change your name ? This ofcourse is not always possible legally but also people will have prior knowledge of you or your family, and then there is the Why Should I?

I first met Manish in Rotherham, maybe seven years ago now. He was introduced as ‘an artist in political exile’. In 2012, Manish was offered an eight-month artist in residency at Patan Museum, through Celia Washington (co-founder of the Kathmandu Contemporary Arts Centre). A year after Manish completed his degree in Kathmandu, Sangeeta Thapa (director of Siddhartha Art Gallery) offered and supported Manish with his first solo art exhibition at the Siddhartha Art Gallery in Kathmandu.

Shockingly, and with global attention, Hindu fundamentalists vandalised the gallery and Manish received death threats significant enough for UNESCO to issue a press release in support of freedom of expression. The work that caused the situation blended iconography from both the East and the West, depicting Hindu gods in superhero costumes that “questions both the portrayal and the portrayed”.

Nick and Marie enabled Manish to come to Rotherham, as he had been forced into hiding, so he came for a six months stay in 2013. During this time Manish met a great many people, and did some charity work in schools. He smiles, saying he saw the good life, living in another world. Then he asked himself: “Am I forgetting what I am trying to do with this lifestyle?”.

On returning to Kathmandu to progress his artistic career, Manish felt unsupported and depressed. He was not an easy artist to represent anymore and his work was considered anti-religion and anti-establishment.

He came back to the UK to visit galleries and museums and while he was visiting Sheffield Hallam University he met with a course tutor, Penny McCarthy. The conversation led to viewing Manish’s portfolio of work, when he was offered a place to study for an MA. The only barrier at that point was his command of the English language. Unsurprisingly Manish went back to Nepal and secured the qualification he needed and has now completed his MA, and was awarded the Diane Willcocks Lifelong Learning Award.

Talking to Manish about his art, what inspires him is like trying to hold water in your hands. He uses everything, “every moment in the world inspires me a lot”. He recognises the complexities within society, and how works of art through history have revealed socialist structures. He is currently working in a supermarket filling shelves and sees capitalism up close, and the power of money. All these things end up expressed in his art.

Hungry gods and the dust (picture by Ryan Braidley)

Currently in his studio at Yorkshire Artspace in Sheffield, Manish is embarking on an ambitious quest to develop within two years a new technique he calls Thang-Su-Flat. This builds on the Super Flat in painting popularised by Takashi Murakami, and also brings in inspiration from the traditional Nepalese traditions of Thangka and Paubha.

At the same time his international reputation is growing, and he has been shortlisted for the UK Government Art Collection.

His exhibition history is impressive, and includes Welt Museum in Vienna, The Hague, Tate Modern, Denmark, New Dehli , etc.

It is quite a remarkable journey, and the fact that Manish has turned adversity into positive artistic expressions is inspirational. To paraphrase Marcel Duchamp, Manish contributes: “I don’t believe in art but I believe in the artist. An artist should challenge the system and ease for the uncomforted.”

FACTFILE:
Website: http://www.manisharijan.com
Email: horizon.millinum@gmail.com/horizon_1985@live.com
Website: https://phaseworldwide.org/about-us/our-story/

Quick Quiz #7

Welcome to the latest Chase magazine website Quick Quiz.

As usual, there are ten questions with multiple choice answers to test your memory and knowledge.

It’s all for fun. You can have a go during your coffee break or at home with the family.

The answers will be revealed on this website on March 10 at 9am.

1 During emergencies, the Government has COBRA meetings. But what does COBRA stand for?
A) Co-ordinated Official British Response Assessment
B) Civilian Organised Bureau for Rapid Activity
C) Cabinet Office Briefing Room A

2 In which Puccini opera do the characters Ping, Pang and Pong appear?
A) Madama Butterfly
B) Tosca
C) Turandot

3 TIM, Orac and BOSS featured in different sci-fi TV series. But what were they?
A) Spaceships
B) Computers
C) Alien commanders

4 Who was the first female newsreader on British television?
A) Barbara Mandell
B) Angela Rippon
C) Nan Winton

5 Who was the first Archbishop of Canterbury?
A) Thomas Cranmer
B) Augustine
C) William Laud

6 What is the name of the company famous for making teddy bears?
A) Wedgewood
B) Faberge
C) Steiff

7 Which of these was NOT part of a trilogy of films by highly esteemed director Krystof Kieslowski?
A) Three Colours Red
B) Three Colours Black
C) Three Colours Blue

8 What is the link between American Erika LaBrie and the Eiffel Tower?
A) She climbed it
B) She painted it
C) She married it

9 How is Queen Elizabeth II related to Queen Victoria?
A) She is her grand-daughter
B) She is her great great grand-daughter
C) She is her distant cousin

10 On what date was South Yorkshire created?
A) April 1, 1974
B) January 1, 1982
C) March 5, 1965