Quick Quiz # 1 – the answers

IF you’ve been scratching your head over the answers to our Quick Quiz # 1 then fret no longer.

Hopefully the questions haven’t caused any rows and it was all in good fun.

There will be another Quick Quiz very soon.

Here are the questions and answers:

Question 1: Who was the first woman to be elected to the House of Commons?
a) Nancy Astor;
b) Constance Markievicz;
c) Barbara Castle.

ANSWER: b) Constance Markievicz – she was elected in 1918 but represented Sinn Fein and so did not take up her seat. Nancy Astor was the first woman to take up her seat in 1919. Barbara Castle gained her seat in 1945.

Question 2: Which great British building has areas in it called the Snake Pit and the Yellow Submarine?
a) York Minster;
b) Houses of Parliament;
c) Buckingham Palace.

ANSWER: b) Houses of Parliament.

Question 3: Who wrote the operas Katya Kabanova and The Makropoulos Affair?
a) Alban Berg;
b) Giacomo Puccini;
c) Leos Janacek.

ANSWER: c) Leos Janacek.

Question 4: What is a tatterdemalion?
a) A scruffy person;
b) Someone who slices potatoes;
c) A commissioned soldier.

ANSWER: a) A scruffy person.

Question 5: Which band released the album A New World Record in the 1970s?
a) Genesis;
b) Electric Light Orchestra;
c) Hawkwind.

ANSWER: b) Electric Light Orchestra – it featured their hits Livin’ Thing, Rockaria! and Telephone Line.

Question 6: How many books are there in the New Testament?
a) 15;
b) 27;
c) 34.

ANSWER: 6) b) 27.

Question 7: Who played Godber in the classic BBC comedy Porridge?
a) Tony Osoba;
b) David Jason;
c) Richard Beckinsale.

ANSWER: c) Richard Beckinsale. David Jason played Blanco and Tony Osoba played McLaren.

Question 8: Which of these was a real ruler?
a) Wenceslaus the One Eyed;
b) Louis the Stupid;
c) Erik the Dog Eater.

ANSWER: a) Wenceslaus the One Eyed.

Question 9: What is a bobolink?
a) A small bird;
b) A big pig;
c) An unusually coloured hamster.

ANSWER: a) A small bird.

Question 10: Who wrote the novel American Psycho?
a) Irvine Welsh;
b) Hubert Selby Jr;
c) Bret Easton Ellis.

ANSWER: c) Bret Easton Ellis, Irvine Welsh is famous for writing Trainspotting and Hubert Selby Jr for Last Exit to Brooklyn.

How an old photo sparked a man’s mission to find out more

Don Gill holds up a copy of the picture of his great uncle Gunner J Westby. 180276-1

by ANTONY CLAY

THE discovery of an old picture of his great uncle set a South Yorkshire man on a journey of discovery.

Don Gill, a district correspondent for the Rotherham Advertiser, tracked down a picture of his relative in an old copy of the paper — but the discovery prompted more questions.

Don, of Tickhill, found an image of John Westby in a 1917 edition of the Advertiser in a tribute section marking the deaths of soldiers in battle.

But he was intrigued on reading that John died of fever and set out to find out more — making the surprise discovery that the gunner lost his life not in Europe but in the Middle East.

He has even discovered that his relative is buried in Baghdad.

Don said: “I found out that the name of my great uncle John, who was born in Rotherham in 1894, is engraved on the World War One memorial in Clifton Park.

“I thought that it was likely that the news of his death in 1917 would have appeared in an edition of the Rotherham Advertiser in that year.

“A reporter checked the archives of the paper and sure enough a photograph of 99793 Gunner John Westby of the 136th Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery appeared in the edition of August 4, 1917, saying simply that John had died of fever.”

John Westby was the brother of Don’s grandmother, Fanny Victoria Westby, who in 1907 married George Gill.

The Westby family lived at 33 Warwick Street, off Wellgate in Rotherham.
After John married his wife Edith in January 1916 at Rotherham Parish Church they lived at number 31 next door to his parents, Don’s great grandfather William Ellis Westby and grandmother Elizabeth Ann Westby.

John was the youngest member of the Westby family and he worked as a warehouse foreman with town glass works company Beatson Clarke.

Don said: “Although small in stature standing five foot six inches tall he obviously had a big heart and in November 1915 at the age 21 years and 10 months he enlisted at the recruiting office in Rotherham to fight for his King and Country.

“In January 1917 he was a member of the British Army Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force that was sent to fight the Turks in the Persian Gulf theatre of war.

“Sadly he contracted malaria that is transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitos and he died in the Number 23 British Stationary Hospital in Baghdad on July 12, 1917.

The picture of John Westby which appeared in the Rotherham Advertiser in 1917

“He was 23 years old and the lad who was born and grew up in Rotherham is buried in the North Gate War Cemetery in far away Baghdad.

“John, whose photograph in his uniform I now have thanks to the Rotherham Advertiser, never again returned to his parents, brothers and sisters back at 33 Warwick Street or to his widow Edith who continued to live at number 31 until her death in August 1924.”

Don said that finding out more about John and his death in Mesopotamia — which roughly correlates to modern-day Iraq and parts of Syria, Turkey, Kuwait and Iran — has had an impact on him.

He said: “I regularly walk passed their red brick terraced homes where they lived when I’m on my way to the New York Stadium to watch Rotherham United and I can only imagine their grief when the news of John’s death reached them over a century ago.

“Like the many Rotherham men who sacrificed their lives fighting for our freedom and whose names are inscribed on the town war memorial, John will not be forgotten.”

Don’s research means he now owns a copy of the attestation form filled in by John when he enlisted in Rotherham.

Don said: “It is in his own handwriting. Many World War One documents were destroyed in the London Blitz in World War Two so it is remarkable that this survived.”

The heat is on at the mansion

WWPT’s facilities manager Julie Readman checking a radiator from 1908 in the Marble Saloon

by ANTONY CLAY

THINGS are heating up nicely at a stately home — or at least they will be soon thanks to a massive cash boost.

Wentworth Woodhouse Preservation Trust is set to replace its old gas central heating system with a new alternative that will cover the whole house.

Money from the Government’s Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage and the Heritage Stimulus Fund totalling £331,200 means the work to explore how to install a ground-source heat pump and heating system can push on.

The mansion’s first heating system — powered by coal — was installed around 1908 by the 7th Earl Fitzwilliam and featured an extensive network of pipes and radiators supplying most of the house.

The same pipes and radiators are still in use today in parts of the property but the fuel is now gas and costs £28,000 a year.

The Trust linked up with 20 other properties in the Historic Houses Association (HHA) to put in a collaborative bid for the first round of awards from the Government fund.

Sarah McLeod, CEO of Wentworth Woodhouse Preservation Trust, thanked Historic England and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport for its backing.

She said: “They have supported the Trust right from the start and have shown once again they are there for us.

“We were up against some very deserving HHA properties and are incredibly grateful.

“We are in dire need of these repairs and are determined to forge ahead with plans for a heating system which will not only be much more efficient, but will be green and sustainable.”

Quick Quiz # 1

IF you have a few minutes to spare, why not try our first Quick Quiz?

Every now and again, we will offer up ten questions for you to muse over whilst having a coffee.

We will put the answers in this Friday at 10am

There isn’t a prize but you can check out how much you know, or perhaps challenge a friend or family member to see who gets the most points.

You could even have a Christmas party quiz!

To give you some help, each question has three options for an answer.

Good luck!

Question 1: Who was the first woman to be elected to the House of Commons?
a) Nancy Astor;
b) Constance Markievicz;
c) Barbara Castle.

Question 2: Which great British building has areas in it called the Snake Pit and the Yellow Submarine?
a) York Minster;
b) Houses of Parliament;
c) Buckingham Palace.

Question 3: Who wrote the operas Katya Kabanova and The Makropoulos Affair?
a) Alban Berg;
b) Giacomo Puccini;
c) Leos Janacek.

Question 4: What is a tatterdemalion?
a) A scruffy person;
b) Someone who slices potatoes;
c) A commissioned soldier.

Question 5: Which band released the album A New World Record in the 1970s?
a) Genesis;
b) Electric Light Orchestra;
c) Hawkwind.

Question 6: How many books are there in the New Testament?
a) 15;
b) 27;
c) 34.

Question 7: Who played Godber in the classic BBC comedy Porridge?
a) Tony Osoba;
b) David Jason;
c) Richard Beckinsale.

Question 8: Which of these was a real ruler?
a) Wenceslaus the One Eyed;
b) Louis the Stupid;
c) Erik the Dog Eater.

Question 9: What is a bobolink?
a) A small bird;
b) A big pig;
c) An unusually coloured hamster.

Question 10: Who wrote the novel American Psycho?
a) Irvine Welsh;
b) Hubert Selby Jr;
c) Bret Easton Ellis.

Who really killed young Irene Hart?

Jeannette Hensby with her book The Rotherham Trunk Murder.

by ANTONY CLAY

A WOMAN claims that a man was wrongly hanged for murder in a book focusing on a notorious Rotherham killing.

Jeannette Hensby says that Andrew Anderson Bagley was wrongly convicted of killing 16-year-old Irene Hart and hiding her body in a trunk back in 1936.

She says that the evidence suggests his son did the killing and Bagley took the fall to protect him.

Jeannette, of Robinets Road in Wingfield, had been fascinated by the case since her grandma told her about it when she was young and felt compelled to look through old documents and reports to see what she could find.

In her book The Rotherham Trunk Murder: Uncovering An 80 Year Old Miscarriage Of Justice, she claims the evidence has been found to prove Bagley innocent.

Jeannette, a former NHS director of mental health services, said: “When I was about nine my grandma told me about this murder.

“I have researched it and I know what my grandma has told me.

“When you know what I know, it’s fairly obvious who did it.”

Bagley, who was born in Nottingham, was known as Bill Smith at the time of the killing on September 12 1936.

The 67-year-old was living in Hartington Road, Masbrough, with his daughter Avice Smith, son Ambrose Smith, and a young woman called Irene who was the daughter of Avice’s husband Walter.

On the day, Avice returned home and found Bagley in the kitchen but no sign of Irene. Later Bagley said he was going to Sheffield and would be home later, but didn’t return.

In the meantime, Avice and Walter had discovered the strangled body of Irene bundled inside an old green tin trunk in the clothes closet of her bedroom. Newspaper had been stuffed into her mouth and a rope was tied twice around her neck.

Bagley’s disappearance prompted the suspicion of the police who launched the biggest national manhunt up to that time. Six weeks later he was tracked him down to Huckhall in Nottinghamshire and charged with the killing.

He was hanged in February 1937 after being found guilty at Leeds Assizes.
Newspapers dubbed it the Rotherham Trunk Murder.

But Jeannette believes the real killer was Ambrose, a deaf and mute dwarf with physical and mental difficulties, who she suggests was infatuated with Irene. There had been signs of sexual activity in the bedroom where the murder occurred though it could not be linked to the crime itself.

Jeannette said: “You can understand why the police thought Bill Smith did it.

“Rather than dob his disabled son in, he went to the gallows.

“It’s obvious that when Bill Smith saw the body, panic seized him.”

Ambrose was never a suspect for the murder but Jeannette is convinced that Irene died at his hands.

Jeannette said: “Bagley was found guilty, and after a botched and covered up appeal to the Central Criminal Court in London, he was hanged in February 1937 by Thomas Pierrepoint at Armley Prison in Leeds, and buried in the prison graveyard.

“I spent the whole of 2015, helped by my sister, looking at all the old newspaper accounts, especially those in the Rotherham Advertiser, and reading court and other records held by the local Rotherham archives, and the National Archives in London.”

Jeannette spent 18 months researching and writing the boo.


* The Rotherham Trunk Murder by Jeannette Hensby is available from Amazon. It is also available in bookshops.

Become an apprentice and learn the skills for work

An apprentice at the AMRC Training Centre in Catcliffe, Rotherham. 150276-1

by ANTONY CLAY

YEARS ago apprenticeships offered by employers were for most people the normal route into a career.

The local factories would offer placements where newcomers to the workplace could spend years learning the essential skills they would need to do a job to the highest standard.

But the popularity of such schemes fell away in recent decades as young people were encouraged towards higher education and offered other routes to work.

Now apprenticeships are back in a big — and a very positive — way.

Thousands of apprenticeships are being offered across the country to give people a vital route into employment, teaching those on them skills as well as offering the pride of a useful job.

The Government has run National Apprenticeship Weeks to highlight the roles available across the country. Private companies and public sector organisations offering apprenticeships have been encouraged to promote what they have to offer.

Ofcourse apprenticeships are not for everyone but for those who have signed up there is opportunity, stability and the chance to prove themselves.

There are many sorts of apprenticeships to suit different people. For example, there are now higher and degree apprenticeships. Different types of apprenticeship provide different qualifications which can make moving around the workplace more effective.

Apprenticeships combine qualifications with work experience — which is something that potential future employers like to see.

What is an apprenticeship? It is a proper job where participants combine practical training with study.

People doing an apprenticeship will work alongside staff, be paid and be given time to study.

Apprenticeships are open to everyone over 16, with no upper age limit.

There are different levels of entry into apprenticeships. The Intermediate level requires five GCSE passes at grade A*- C or 9 – 4. The Advanced level requires two A level passes/Level 3 Diploma/International Baccalaureate. The Higher level needs applicants to have a Foundation degree and above, with the Degree level requiring a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree.

Where can people find out more about apprenticeships? There are many sources of information but a great place to start is apprenticeships.gov.uk. You can search and apply for vacancies on Find an apprenticeship on GOV.UK. Once registered on Find an apprenticeship, email and text alerts can be set up about new apprenticeship vacancies.

For information on some well-known employers, visit amazingapprenticeships.com.

People can also contact the National Apprenticeship Helpdesk on 0800 015 0400 or email nationalhelpdesk@findapprenticeship.service.gov.uk.
Another good source of information is available by visiting YouTube and searching apprenticeships/NAS.

At any one time there are between 12-20,000 apprenticeship vacancies available at gov.uk/apply-apprenticeship.

So, if you are looking for fulfilling work or thinking about starting your career, look into the opportunities offered by apprenticeships. It could change your life!

Organ donation – the rules have changed

Since earlier this year, virtually everyone has become an organ donor unless they have opted out. Chase reporter ANTONY CLAY finds out more

NEW rules over organ donation came into effect earlier this year which have an impact on everyone.

With all the confusion over coronavirus you might be forgiven for not noticing that since May virtually everyone who dies will be assumed to have agreed that organs can be harvested to help others.

This reversed the previous assumption that unless you carried a donor card or your bereaved relatives gave permission, organs could not be taken.

The change aims to combat the chronic shortage of organs to help seriously ill people in need of new body parts.

For thousands, a new organ would literally save their lives.

More than 6,000 people in the UK are on the transplant waiting list, while last year over 400 people died waiting for a new organ.

The new rule is being called Max and Keira’s Law though its official name is the Organ Donation (Deemed Consent) Act.

All adults in England are now considered as having agreed to donate their own organs when they die unless they record a decision not to donate, known as opt out, or are in one of the excluded groups.

Excluded groups include people under 18, those who lack the mental capacity to understand the new rule and take the necessary action, and people who have lived in England for less than 12 months or who are not living here voluntarily.

But families will still be involved before any organ or tissue donation goes ahead.

Family members can discuss the situation with NHS Blood and Transplant specialist nurses.

NHS Blood and Transplant’s awareness and education campaign, Pass it On, has helped raise awareness of the law change.

England has introduced the new system after it was proved to work elsewhere in the UK. Wales had an opt out system after changing the country’s law in December 2015 and Jersey introduced the opt out system in July 2019. Scotland will also be moving to an opt out system from March 2021.

Anyone wanting to find out more, can visit http://www.organdonation.nhs.uk where they can also register a decision to opt in or opt out. People can also telephone 0300 303 2094.

Max Johnson is the 12-year-old heart recipient who championed the law change and saw the law named after him and his young donor, Keira Ball.

Max welcomed the decision to change the law.

He said: “There are so many people who are waiting, just like I was, for the call to say that a suitable heart, kidney, lungs or liver has been found.

“I just hope that this law change can help save more lives.

“When you are waiting for a transplant, every day counts and I hope that everyone who hears about the law change will be reminded to speak to their family, so they know what you want.

“I am proud that when people speak about Max and Keira’s Law, they will be reminded to think of Keira, and I hope by remembering her in this way, that she will go on to help save even more lives than she already has.”

Laura Beattie is one of 6,000 people across the UK still waiting for a transplant.

Laura (31), from Stretford in Manchester, has cystic fibrosis and has been waiting for a lung transplant since August 2018.

She said: “There are always mixed emotions, especially depending on how you feel on each day. It is always in the back of my mind and sometimes it does come to the forefront. I always have to have my phone on me and have it on loud as I don’t know when the call is coming.

“A transplant would make an absolutely massive difference in all aspects of my life from being able to do simple things without being breathless doing the smallest tasks, to being able to go out and about without feeling unwell and exhausted.

“I really hope the law change encourages more people to support and even just consider organ donation because a transplant is my only option now.”

Secretary of State for Health, Matt Hancock

Secretary of State for Health, Matt Hancock, said the new rules were vital to save many people’s lives.

He said: “Too many people lose their lives waiting for an organ, and I’ve been determined to do what I can to boost organ donation rates.

“So I’m incredibly proud of the action we are taking with this new law. This is an important step forward in making organ donation easier and more available to those who need it and could help save hundreds of lives every year.

“I pay tribute to the brave campaigning of families such as Max and Keira’s, whose tireless work on this issue has made a huge difference.”

One of the first families in England to agree to donation, under the new laws, was the family of Lewis Mcdonough, from Solihull in Birmingham, who died aged 18 after a sudden cardiac arrest. Although Lewis had not recorded an organ donation decision or spoken with his family, he went on to save three lives after donating his liver and kidneys.

Lewis’s mum, Lisa Cruise, who is an A&E nurse at Sandwell Hospital, said: “As a nurse, I had often supported families in coming to terms with the sudden loss of a loved one and even cared for patients who have gone on to be organ donors. However, I never in a million years thought I would ever be the one in that situation. Not least for my handsome, funny, full of life 18-year-old son.

“Yet as soon as I saw the look in the eyes of the consultant who came to speak with me, I just knew it wasn’t going to be good news. Having been the one to break difficult news to families many times before, I recognised a certain look in his eyes that told me all I needed to know.

“Although I was already on the NHS Organ Donor Register, and aware of the recent change in the law, sadly it was never something we had properly discussed as a family. It was almost impossible getting Lewis to have a serious conversation. While I knew straightaway that organ donation was the right decision, I would urge everyone to speak with your friends and family today.

“To know that Lewis has saved lives is our one comfort. I kept thinking that while we were hearing the worst possible news, others would be getting those life changing calls and crying tears of happiness. That was what kept me going.”

The changes in the law came about as a result of years of campaigning by patients waiting for transplant and families of those who have donated. One of these was Fez Awan from Blackburn who, earlier this year, was waiting for his third kidney transplant and knew that his chance of a call was lower due to the fact he is from a South Asian background.

Fez said: “Even though more people from Black and Asian backgrounds are more likely to require a transplant, people from these backgrounds are currently still much less likely to agree to donation.

“For a long time, the topic of death and organ donation has been a cultural taboo; however, I am pleased to say that we are slowly starting to see this change. Younger generations especially are becoming increasingly open to the idea of organ donation. I hope that the change in the law will encourage more people to have an open and honest conversation with their wider family members.

“Without the selfless generosity of the donors and their families who enabled me to receive my transplants, there is a good chance I wouldn’t be here today. Some people might be worried about how organ donation sits with their religion or their beliefs, but all major religions in the UK have given support for organ donation in principle. What greater gift can there be than to be able to save someone else’s life?”

Anthony Clarkson, director of organ and tissue donation and transplantation at NHS Blood and Transplant, said:

“The last six months have been some of the most challenging for both the NHS and the country as a whole, so to see the numbers of people saying yes to organ donation, and in doing so giving the ultimate gift of life at this difficult time, is really incredible. It shows just how strong the support for organ donation is across the country.

“We are humbled that despite everything, the remarkable efforts of organ donation and transplant teams across the country, as well as the enduring support of donor families, has enabled us to keep transplants going for those in most urgent need throughout the pandemic.
“Even though the law around organ donation has now changed, it is important that people know that families continue to be consulted if organ donation becomes a possibility.

“Sadly, many organ donation opportunities are still lost each year, as families don’t know if their loved one wanted to be a donor or not. Please don’t wait: register your organ donation decision and speak with your family today.”

Great jobs for when a degree isn’t the answer

There are many exciting job options out there for people who don’t want to embark on higher education. Chase reporter ANTONY CLAY looks at a few options

AFTER all the brouhaha over exam results this year, many young people may be thinking they want to steer well away from any more education.

Others may not have got the grades they need for a university placement.

Some on the other hand will be choosing to participate in the increasingly popular apprenticeships that are available.

Other young people may even have been offered employment.

There will be many who are wondering what to do next but the truth is that there are plenty of opportunities out there for people not wanting to take a degree or who can’t for whatever reason.

Indeed, according to teen magazine Future-Mag, more than half — 54 per cent — of graduates say they would think again about choosing university as the best way to find a job.

Many young people don’t fancy another three years of study, cannot face the debt of university, or didn’t get the expected exam results.

With so many young people getting degrees these days, the idea they will all walk into well-paid jobs and glittering careers is something of a myth anyway.

But there are plenty of new routes into careers that were once the preserve of graduates.

Three in four UK businesses believe more young people will choose earn-as-you-learn routes in the next few years, according to research.
Future-Mag – at future-mag: https://future-mag.co.uk – has compiled a list of 10 top jobs that don’t require a degree:

1 Nurse
The lowdown –
If you have been thinking of becoming a nurse but don’t want to go to university full-time, this could be for you. The Government has just announced a massive £172m investment into nursing. The money is to allow healthcare employers to take on up to 2,000 nursing degree apprentices every year over the next four years.

Getting there
Nursing apprenticeships offer an alternative to full-time university courses, allowing people to earn a salary while their tuition costs are paid. At the end of the apprenticeship – which usually takes four years – apprentices are able to qualify as fully registered nurses.
You will usually need four or five GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and A levels, or equivalent, for a degree apprenticeship.
Pay: £24,907 to £37,890.

2 Air Traffic Controller
The lowdown
They help to keep some of the busiest airspace in the world moving. The work is challenging and demanding, but it’s immensely rewarding too. Air traffic controllers give information and advice to airline pilots to help them take off and land safely and on time.

Getting there
You have to be over 18 and have at least five GCSEs or equivalent at Grade 4 or above (previously A-C) or Scottish Nationals 5 Grade A-C or equivalent, including English and maths. As well as having a good level of physical and mental fitness, you must satisfy the basic medical requirements set down by the Civil Aviation Authority.
The National Air Traffic Control Service (NATS) has developed a series of games to help gauge whether you are right for this career.
Pay: £17,000 to £50,000.

Family Law book with legal gavel

3 Solicitor
The lowdown
Solicitors advise clients about the law and act on their behalf in legal matters, and can specialise in a host of areas, including contract, criminal, commercial and family law, and much more.

Getting there
You can now become a solicitor by training on the job since new solicitor apprenticeships (level 7) were approved in 2015. This isn’t an easy route – you will need to pass a series of tough exams. You will need good A levels and it can take five to six years to complete.
Pay: £25,000 to £100,000.

4 Visual Effects Artist
The lowdown
They help artists produce all the whizzy visual effects (VFX). They assist senior VFX artists and prepare the elements required for the final shots. Eventually they will be employed by post-production companies working on commercials, television series and feature films.

Getting there
You could do a practical short course at London’s MetFilm School (Ealing Studios) and try to get into the industry that way, or do an apprenticeship via Next Gen.
Pay: from £18,000 to £50,000 once qualified.

5 Computer forensic analyst (cyber security)
The lowdown
Investigate and thwart cyber crime. They might work for the police or security services, or for computer security specialists and in-house teams. They will follow and analyse electronic data, ultimately to help uncover cyber crime such as commercial espionage, theft, fraud or terrorism.

Getting there
Cyber security professionals are in high demand in both the public and private sector in the wake of high level breaches and perceived terrorism threats. There is a severe shortage of qualified professionals. Cyber security higher apprenticeships (level 4) are offered by major infrastructure and energy companies and the security services.
Pay: £20,000 to £60,000.

6 Estate Agent
The lowdown
Estate agents sell and rent out commercial and residential property, acting as negotiators between buyers and sellers.

Getting there
Some estate agents offer an intermediate apprenticeship as a junior estate agent, or you may be able to start as a trainee sales negotiator and learn on the job.
Pay: estate agents often work on commission which means that you have a basic salary and also earn a percentage of the sale or rental price of any property you sell or rent £15,000 to £40,000.

7 Police Officer
The lowdown
This is another profession where the Government has pumped in large amounts of cash to help recruit new officers. If you have been considering this as a career, now could be the right time to apply. Police officers keep law and order, investigate crime, and support crime prevention.

Getting there
There is no formal educational requirement for direct application but you will have to be physically fit and pass written tests. Or, you could start by doing a police constable degree apprenticeship.
You will usually need four or five GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and college qualifications like A levels for a degree apprenticeship.
You can get a taste of what it’s like to work with the police by volunteering as a special constable. You could also get paid work as a police community support officer (PCSO) before applying for police officer training.
Pay: £20,000 to £60,000.

8 Public Relations Officer
The lowdown
Public relations (PR) officers manage an organisation’s public image and reputation. You might get involved in planning PR campaigns, monitoring and reacting to the public and media, writing and editing press releases, speeches, newsletters, leaflets, brochures and websites, creating content on social media.

Getting there
There is no set entry route to become a public relations officer but it may be useful to do a relevant subject at college, like a Foundation Certificate in Marketing. You can work towards this role by doing a public relations assistant higher apprenticeship.
You will usually need four or five GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and A levels, or equivalent, for a higher or degree apprenticeship.
Pay: £18,000 to £90,000.

9 Youth Worker
The lowdown
Work with young people and help them develop personally and socially. They might work with local services, youth offending teams or voluntary organisations and community groups. They might help organise sports and other activities, or be involved in counselling and mentoring, or liaising with authorities.

Getting there
Many enter youth work as a volunteer or paid worker, but you can now qualify via a youth work apprenticeship.
Pay: £23,250 to £37,500.

10 Army Officer
The lowdown
Undergo leadership training before choosing from a wide range of specialisms, including platoon commander, helicopter pilot, intelligence, logistics, even work in military medicine and healthcare.

Getting there
You will typically need five GCSEs at grade 9 to 4 (A* to C) or above and two A levels. You will have to take aptitude and ability tests, pass a fitness test and interview before a more rigorous assessment to see if you are capable mentally and physically.
Pay: £27,273 to £42,009.